Category Archives: Calls for Papers and Proposals

Calls for Papers and Proposals

2018 Comparative Drama conference

To be held in Orlando Florida on April 5-7th, the 2018 Comparative Drama Conference is seeking papers and panel proposals, due December 3rd.

Abstract Submission Deadline: 3 December 2017

Papers reporting on original investigations and critical analysis of research and developments in the field of drama and theatre are invited for the 42nd Comparative Drama Conference, hosted by Rollins College in Orlando, Florida, to be held April 5-7, 2018 . Papers may be comparative across nationalities, periods and disciplines; and may deal with any issue in dramatic literature, criticism, theory, and performance, or any method of historiography, translation, or production. Papers should be 15 minutes in length, written for oral presentation, and accessible to a multi-disciplinary audience. Scholars and artists in all languages and literatures are invited to email a 250 word abstract in English to Dr. William C. Boles at compdrama@rollins.edu by 3 December 2017. Please include paper title, author’s name, status (faculty, graduate student, other/scholar-at-large), institutional affiliation, and postal address at top left. Abstracts must present a clear argument and have an appropriate scope (usually two or fewer works). (PLEASE be sure to add compdrama@rollins.edu to your accepted email list so that conference emails will not be rejected by your server. Ask your IT administrator how to do so.) If you do not receive e-mail confirmation that we received your abstract/submission within 14 days, we did not receive your submission. Please contact us immediately at wboles@rollins.edu. Those whose abstracts are accepted for presentation are expected to attend the conference. Due to the number of submissions, the adjudicators are unable to offer specific feedback on panels, abstracts, or scripts. Abstracts will be printed in the conference program. Accepted presentations will be scheduled in a room with a projector, screen, and speakers. If you wish to use a laptop, please bring your own as well as a dongle. We do not provide remote control devices.

Pre-organized Panels

Pre-organized Panels and Roundtables will also be considered. A pre-organized panel should include three papers. Each paper should be 15 minutes in length. Panel proposals should include (1) a copy of each panelist’s 250 word abstract with paper title, author’s name, institutional affiliation, status, postal address and email address at top left, and (2) a succinct, 50-word rationale for the grouping of the papers. The panel organizer should email the abstracts and rationale to compdrama@rollins.edu by 3 December 2017. A pre-organized roundtable should include at least four participants. Roundtable proposals should include (1) a succinct, 50 word explanation of and rationale for the roundtable topic, (2) a timeline of the program, including time for audience interaction and Q & A, and (3) clear evidence of each participant’s expertise in the topic area. Do not send entire vitae. Include only evidence applicable to the roundtable topic. The panel or roundtable organizer should email the abstracts and rationale to compdrama@rollins.edu by 3 December 2017.

NAVSA 2018 Call for Panels

NAVSA 2018 will be held in St. Petersberg Florida October 11-14, 2018. They’re currently accepting panel proposals which can be submitted at https://www.navsa.org/submissions/conference-proposals/

From their site: “We are excited to announce our three plenaries: Erika Rappaport, Belinda Edmondson, and Sally Shuttleworth. These keynotes anchor three foci of the conference, and we hope there will be lively conversations on Caribbean Studies, Global Victorians, and Science/Medicine, even as the conference overall ranges more widely.”

New Directions in Feminist Media Studies

deadline for submissions: 
September 21, 2017
 
full name / name of organization: 
Keri Walsh, Fordham University
 
contact email: 
 

Red Velvet Seat: Women’s Writings on the Cinema: The First Fifty Years (2006), which brings together a rich variety of writings by authors including Maya Deren, Virginia Woolf, Colette, and Lillian Gish that might provide starting places for new feminist film histories and theories. Other recent interventions include Kirsten Pullen’s Like a Natural Woman: Spectacular Female Performance in Classical Hollywood (2014) which explores the development of naturalist film acting techniques by performers including Carmen Miranda and Lena Horne; Shelley Stamp’s Lois Weber in Early Hollywood (2015) which argues that Weber “was considered one of the era’s “three great minds” alongside D. W. Griffith and Cecil B. DeMille;”; and Jennifer Smyth’s forthcoming Nobody’s Girl Friday: The Women Who Ran Hollywood which promises to be “a new history of Hollywood that puts women at the center of production.” The momentum surrounding the re-telling of film history to include women promises to extend to all quarters of media studies. Works that already broach this broader terrain include Jennifer Christine Nash’s The Black Body in Ecstasy: Reading Race, Reading Pornography (2014) and Christine Ehrick’s Radio and the Gendered Soundscape: Women and Broadcasting in Argentina and Uruguay, 1930-1950 (2015).This seminar seeks papers that contribute to this significant new direction in media studies, and that extend to new areas of inquiry. Papers might work to answer questions such as: How does new work on women and media have the potential to alter, challenge, or transform existing canonical concepts in the study of media, such as auteurship, montage, aura, seriality, or melodrama? What new concepts might emerge as significant in light of this work? Who are, or might be, some of the key figures and foundational works for this new set of histories? How and where is the presence of women’s authorship in evidence even in works that have traditionally been attributed to men? How might we challenge and expand our methodologies so that we can see women’s contributions more clearly? How can these new media histories be constructed as inclusively as possible, so as not to replicate the logics of exclusion that have characterized media histories of the past? In what newly enabling ways might we understand issues of technology and disciplinarity in relation to women’s role in the creation and reception of media, whether as performers, writers, technicians, producers, audiences, theorists, scholars?

Submit 250-word abstracts to Keri Walsh kwalsh36@fordham.edu by September 21, 2017.

(This is an ACLA session that is not yet guaranteed).

Lit-TV: A Two-Day Symposium Exploring Contemporary US Television and “the Literary”

deadline for submissions:
December 1, 2017
full name / name of organization:
Edinburgh Napier University / Durham University

Organisers: Dr Arin Keeble (Edinburgh Napier) and Dr Sam Thomas (Durham).

Keynote: Professor Stephen Shapiro (Warwick University)

We are seeking proposals for a symposium to be hosted by the School of Arts and Creative Industries at Edinburgh Napier University (Merchiston Campus) on May 5-6, 2018.

Contemporary US television is frequently conceived of, promoted and analysed as “literary”. Following the game-changing impact of The Sopranos (1999-2007), The Wire (2002-2008) can potentially be identified as a paradigm case here: it was originally pitched to HBO as a “novel” for television; it has been famously compared to the serial works of Dickens; it has received enthusiastic endorsements from writers such as Junot Díaz and Zadie Smith; its creator David Simon has been suggested by some commentators as a worthy recipient of the Nobel Prize for Literature; it has been studied and taught in university English Departments.

Beyond The Wire, there are examples from across the genre spectrum of an intriguing, multifaceted interplay between screen and page. Cult favourite Justified (2010-2015) is deeply rooted in the distinctive prose of Elmore Leonard and pays tribute to the creator of its principle characters in reverential yet playful ways. Sons of Anarchy (2007-2013) fuses extreme pulp violence and melodrama with the narrative frame of Hamlet. Shows as diverse as Breaking Bad (2008-2013), True Detective (2014-) and Orange is the New Black (2013-) feature strategic allusions to all manner of literary texts. A recent spate of productions, including The Man in the High Castle (2015-), American Gods (2017-) and The Handmaid’s Tale (2017), are based on influential novels — inspiring much discussion about the new possibilities for literary adaptation and even, in the case of the latter, acts of political protest.

Tied to profound changes in the production and reception of television, these series demonstrate a range of entrenched associations with literary culture. The relationship between television and the literary is also a crucial factor in recent debates about prestige, canonicity and contemporary value systems. With these points in mind, critics such as Greg Metcalf have gone so far as to assert that television now has the capacity “to create what we think of as literature” (The DVD Novel, 2012).

Cutting against this, however, is a wave of scholarship that focusses on how such programmes might resist and/or diverge from the literary tag, often by embellishing narrative possibilities that are unique to television. In Complex TV (2015), for instance, Jason Mittell argues that “such cross-media comparisons obscure rather than reveal the specificities of television’s storytelling form”. In ‘Breaking Bad’ and Dignity (2015), Elliot Logan claims that the celebrated series challenges the way in which the “literary” is held up as an ideal for television to aspire to.

In many respects, the analysis of contemporary US television therefore speaks to a rich cultural history that encompasses both cross-pollination and opposition, while at the same time opening up compelling questions about present and future relationships between narrative media.

Ultimately, the two-day symposium seeks to contribute to emerging scholarship on the nature and value of televisual storytelling vis-à-vis the literary.

We invite proposals for 20 minute papers addressing (but not limited to) the following areas:

  • Parallels, converges and (dis)connections between literary and televisual narrative form
  • Seriality
  • Literary sources / adaptation / allusion
  • The relationship between televisual and literary genres (crime, dystopia, the gothic, social realism, and so on)
  • The relationship between televisual and literary places / regions
  • Television and literary heritage / tradition
  • Theoretical paradigms for (re)thinking the relationship between television and the literary
  • Value / cultural capital / canonicity
  • The legitimacy of ‘literary tv’ as a concept in culture and criticism

Please send abstracts to littvconference2018@gmail.com by December 1, 2017

SCMS 2018: “I Want My New Music Television”:Emerging Field of Popular Music and Television

deadline for submissions:
August 11, 2017
full name / name of organization:
Kristen Galvin
contact email:

I Want My New Music Television: The Emerging Field of Popular Music and Television

CFP, Society for Cinema and Media Studies: Toronto, March 14-18, 2018

From Empire (2015–), to Vinyl (2016), to Lip Sync Battle (2015), to Grease Live! (2016), television in the United States seems preoccupied with remaking, reperforming and reimagining the histories and myths of popular music. This panel seeks to survey the recent landscape of popular music-centric programming on television, across network, cable, and online platforms, and outside of considerations of the music video or soundtrack. This varied field encompasses multiple genres, such as comedy, melodrama, period drama, documentary, musical, and reality singing competitions. Like intersections of film and popular music, these post-network era programs often bank on the star power of established celebrities in the music industry, big-budgets, and/or Oscar-winning directors.

This panel is particularly interested in interrogating how popular music on television is especially productive for examining representations of race, class, gender, sexuality, nationality, and industry. A secondary goal is to examine how televisual narratives negotiate and play with music genres and histories, in ways that operate as nostalgically pleasing, but conversely, may also be off-putting to their built-in audience of music fans. Collectively, this panel aims to answer how and in what ways does such programming reinforce and/or criticize the conventions and codes of the popular music genres, and the texts and tropes that they depict.

Suggested programs and specials (but not limited to):

Network Musicals (Hairspray Live!, Grease Live!, The Wiz Live!, The Rocky Horror Picture Show: Let’s Do the Time Warp Again)

Remakes (Dirty Dancing)

Period drama (The Get Down, Vinyl, Sun Records)

Melodrama (Empire, Star, Nashville)

Comedies (Glee, Roadies, Sex & Drugs & Rock & Roll)

Reality Television (The Voice, American Idol, Lip Sync Battle)

Documentary (Defiant Ones, Hip-Hop Evolution)

Proposals must include an abstract (2500 characters/250-300 words); 3-5 bibliographic sources; and a brief biography (500 characters/50-100 words).  Please email your proposal to Kristen Galvin by August 11, 2017 (kgalvin@scad.edu). A response will be sent to all submissions by August 15, 2017. Selected submissions and contributors will also be considered for inclusion in an anthology.

“Breath: Image and Sound,” a special issue

deadline for submissions:
September 15, 2017
full name / name of organization:
New Review of Film and Television Studies
contact email:

New Review of Film and Television Studies seeks contributions for a special issue on “Breath: Image and Sound.” Contributors are encouraged to consider, among other topics, the interplay between breath and particular media; phenomenologies or phenomenalities of breath and air; and breathing in different affective modes and genres. Possible research questions include, but are not limited to:

  • What role has breath played in the development of screen technologies?
  • How have the narrative and world-building properties of breath transformed across screen cultures? And how is breath conventionalized in various genres—be it Linda Williams’ “body genres” (melodrama, pornography, and horror) or other, perhaps emerging, genres?
  • How does breath operate as a locus of viscerality in situations of intimacy, radical freedom, or violence?
  • How does breath mediate race, gender, sexual orientation, dis/ability, and citizenship?
  • How does breath render environments, from confined to expansive, from toxic to pastoral?
  • How is breath mobilized to convey (or withhold) emotion? How does breath induce mimetic or nonmimetic reactions on the part of the spectators?
  • How does breath produce continuity in or disrupt dialogue, gestures and actions, and diegetic or extradiegetic sound?

Please send a brief abstract (and direct all inquiries) to guest editor Jean-Thomas Tremblay (tremblay@uchicago.edu) by September15th, 2017. Full essays (below 9,000 words, including references), should they be commissioned, will be due on February 1st, 2018.