Category Archives: Calls for Papers and Proposals

Calls for Papers and Proposals

Renaissance Literature and Modern Sociopolitical Applications: Leadership, Power, and Literary Legacies

deadline for submissions:
May 15, 2018
full name / name of organization:
California State University, Stanislaus
contact email:

Editors Tony Perrello and C. Anne Engert welcome proposals for individual and co-authored chapters for a volume entitled Renaissance Literature and Modern Sociopolitical Applications: Leadership, Power, and Literary Legacies. We are in the process of assembling a collection of essays that explores the current American crises of leadership through the dramatic literature of the English Renaissance or vice versa. We believe that many of our colleagues are already talking about the intersection between these two topics, and we envision this edited volume as an opportunity to further such exploration in a scholarly venue. Palgrave MacMillan has shown interest in the project, which we aim to complete by March of 2019.

Crises of leadership fill the news today, on multiple levels. This edited volume of essays will present discussions that offer analyses of Renaissance texts and how they may display relevance to modern sociopolitical conditions. We are challenged to understand, and sometimes resist, increasingly toxic structures of leadership and power in our midst. Such understanding may emerge from insights found in the rich literary legacy of political crises and the deeply flawed leadership behind them. Such resistance may accumulate along lines of gender and sexuality, racial and social identities, or alliances among unlikely companions. From both these lines of inquiry come questions that may involve a multi-disciplinary approach. The following are some suggested topics (others under the same general theme are welcome):

 

  • Trickle-down coarseness, vulgarity, anxieties, fears?
  • Gaslighting as a leadership strategy
  • The collapse of truth and/or dealing with life in a post-truth society
  • The denial of death as a response to imperiled empire
  • Tribalism and its effects in a complex society
  • The responsibilities, complications, and anxieties of enabling incompetence
  • The perils of friends, enemies, and frenemies as political bedfellows
  • Betrayals, denied and admitted
  • Spectacle, melodrama, and distraction as leadership style
  • Dealing with a leader’s Dark Triad personality (Machiavellianism, narcissism, and psychopathy)
  • The pleasures and dangers of taunting from a bully pulpit
  • Dealing with the devil and getting exactly what you thought you wanted
  • When governance becomes a reality show
  • Mourning, nostalgia, and fear as the operators of crisis
  • Anti-intellectualism and idiocracy
  • Do we get the leadership we deserve?
  • The normalization of the scandalous and cognitive dissonance among traditionalists
  • Political speech in the absence of meaning
  • Feeding the base, shaping and shifting the narrative
  • A foil, a foil, my kingdom for someone to counterpunch
  • Conjuring demons and hunting witches
  • Dangerous liaisons and hidden agendas
  • We know he’s flawed, but he’s God’s tool
  • Throw open wide the Overton window
  • The voices of the people during times of crisis in leadership

Proposals of 500 words should be sent to Tony Perrello at tperrello@csustan.edu by 15 May, 2018. Please include a provisional title and a brief CV. Full-length papers will be solicited from these proposals, with final chapters (expected length: 6000 words) due by the end of February, 2019.

 Timeline

CFP deadline: 15 May, 2018

Decisions communicated by: 15 June, 2018

Drafts of essays due: 17 December, 2018

Completed essays due: 18 February, 2019

Manuscript submitted: March, 2019

ReFocus: The Films of João Pedro Rodrigues & João Rui Guerra da Mata

deadline for submissions:
June 15, 2018
full name / name of organization:
José Duarte/Filipa Rosário – School of Arts and Humanities

ReFocus: The Films of João Pedro Rodrigues & João Rui Guerra da Mata

With a career that spans over twenty years, João Pedro Rodrigues and João Rui Guerra da Mata are one of the most creative duos in contemporary filmmaking working within the context of Portuguese cinema. Acknowledged by several film festivals (Cannes, Indie Lisboa, Locarno, New York) as major Portuguese directors, and by the Harvard Film Archive as creators whose works “reflect the multifarious history of film, from classic genres to experimental film”, both filmmakers have contributed to the growing interest in Portuguese cinema.

 

Their works, either individually or collaborative, tell us particular stories of love and human desire, mythologizing places, environments and characters. Rodrigues and Guerra da Mata’s cinema challenge the audience by placing the viewers in hybrid territories where the auteurs explore their own obsessions: from the urban streets of Lisbon (O Fantasma/The Phantom, 2000), to the dark alleys of Macao (A Última Vez Que Vi Macau/The Last Time I Saw Macao, 2012), and to the “natural” world of O Ornitólogo/The Ornithologist (2016).

 

Together, or individually, they have been delving into different portraits that defy general cinematic conventions and focus on the constant reinvention of cinema and identity. In this sense, the authors’ own journey in cinema is also a journey on the many possibilities of the different identities and cultures that an artist (and a nation) can encompass and inhabit.

 

Within this context, we are accepting submissions on any aspect of these directors’ oeuvre – from comprehensive approaches (influences, themes, style) to more diverse essays –, but we are especially looking for chapters on the following:

 

–          João Pedro Rodrigues & João Rui Guerra da Mata as auteurs;

–          Melodrama;

–          Identity;

–          Displacements;

–          The local and the global;

–          Marginal cinema;

–          Transnational cinema;

–          Oriental cycle (Multiculturalism, Identity);

–          Queer Cinema;

–          Gender/Genre;

–          Contemporary art cinema;

–          Mise-en-scène and/or dispositifs;

–          Soundscapes;

–          Digital filmmaking;

–          Artworks and Installations;

–          Autobiography/Memory;

–          Docufiction;

–          Expanded cinema;

–          Slow cinema;

 

 

The Films of João Pedro Rodrigues & João Rui Guerra da Mata will be one of the scholarly editions to be published by the University of Edinburgh Press in the ReFocus series on international directors. Series editors are Robert Singer, PhD and Gary D. Rhodes, PhD.

 

Please send your 250-750 word proposal and CV to thefilmsofportuguesecinema@gmail.com by June 15, 2018. We welcome initial email enquiries to discuss possible proposals.

 

Final submissions will be approximately 6000 to 8000 words, in English, referenced in Chicago endnote style, and submitted by November 1, 2018.

 

Any questions can be sent to

José Duarte & Filipa Rosário

(School of Arts & Humanities, University of Lisbon)

The Great War(s): Our Story Bucharest, Romania: 8 – 10 May, 2018

deadline for submissions:
February 25, 2018
full name / name of organization:
The “G.Oprescu” Institute of Art History, Bucharest

Third International Conference on Balkan Cinema

The Great War(s): Our Story

Bucharest, Romania: 8 – 10 May, 2018

CALL FOR PAPERS

Following on the second International Conference on Balkan Cinema that took place in Belgrade in 2017, The Great War(s): Our Story aims to explore how the Great War and other conflicts in the region have been narrated through cinema. The 3rd International Conference on Balkan cinema will focus on moving images made by filmmakers both from within and outside the Balkans in order to highlight the connections and differences between these war narratives that have at times coalesced into “our story”. The term “our” can refer self-reflexively to a view from the Balkans as both a unified but also more dispersed space, but also to a range of identities: victims or perpetrators, civilians or soldiers, women and children in devastated cities and in the wasteland of the countryside, or men on the front, the generations of participants or the post-generations.

These war narratives told from different perspectives of the involved parties eventually challenge History or work with it, or bring together diverse and often confronting and competing national histories.

 

The “G. Oprescu” Institute of Art History in Bucharest hosts the event in commemoration of 1914-18 War, but also as the opportunity to analyse and map out the rich range of insights offered by cinematic images of war and recounted through multiple narratives of wars in the region – from the Balkan Wars to the breakup of former Yugoslavia. War has been one of those perennially rich topics since the beginning of cinema, narrated through a wide range of genre guises, from documentaries to fiction films, war spectacles, historical films, melodramas, musicals etc. For instance, documentary war footage is a key component in historiography, while fictional portrayals of war are source of entertainment and pleasure, as well as material for the recognition of trauma, suffering, and victimisation. Nowadays, popular archival documentaries or docufictions have transformed films on history into “memory making films”, by showing that cinematic narratives of the past and present wars are important factors in the politics of remembering and forgetting, and constituents of collective/individual/national memory and identity.

 

Being part of a series, the conference aims to further develop transnational scholarship, transcend Balkanism and exoticism, and offer critical explorations of historical and contemporary manifestations of South Eastern European cinemas. It also helps the building of the transnational community of scholars working on the cinemas of the Balkans, South/Eastern Europe, the borders and neighbouring regions such as Central Europe or Near East, works of diaspora or communities in exile, spanning from early cinema on nitrate stock to contemporary digital cinema; and dealing with a range of themes set in the present or the past.

A range of possible themes for conference papers includes, but is not limited to:

 

  • The First and Second World Wars as the cornerstones of cinema in the Balkans
  • War and conflict – a typical Balkan topic?
  • Representation and Self-representation of the Balkans
  • War and archives
  • Changing concepts of war, changing narratives of war.
  • History and memory in cinematic war narratives
  • Intertextuality and transmediality of the past, present and future
  • Representing/deconstructing “the nation” on screen
  • Cultural memory and Balkan cinema
  • Reading and re-writing film (hi)stories
  • History, Military and Film Archives
  • Multidirectional memory in cinema

 

Special event. Public lecture

Prof. dr Dina Iordanova

Film Studies Department, University of St.Andrews      

Keynote speakers

Prof. dr Nevena Daković                      

Faculty of Dramatic Arts, University of Arts, Belgrade

Prof. dr Dominique Nasta 
Université Libre de Bruxelles   

Conference language: English

Presentation time: 20 minutes

Proposal submission deadline: February 25th, 2018

Admission notification date: March 20th, 2018

Proposal length: 250 words + short CV (Abstract proposals, names, affiliations and short CVs should be sent as ONE Word document) to the address balkanfilmconference@gmail.com

CFP: Performance, Politics, and Play

CFP: Performance, Politics, and Play (1/15/2018; 9/13-16/2018)

Performance, Politics, and Play
International Society for Cultural History
September 13-16, 2018
New York City

In response to the “performative turn” in the humanities, the ongoing interest in bio- and body-politics, and the growing attention to leisure, dance, and sport studies, the International Society for Cultural History invites paper and panel proposals for its 2018 annual conference on Performance, Politics, and Play. Scholars working on any historical period or location are encouraged to explore this theme. Topics may include (but are by no means limited to):

  • performative/bodily practices of politics and play
  • political performances
  • substance candidates vs. performance candidates
  • the relationship of performance studies to cultural history
  • leisure practices (reading, cooking, hiking, feasts, travel, holidays, café culture, theater, opera, cinemas, and restaurants)
  • the interconnection of labor and leisure (how the labor of some provides the possibility of leisure for others)
  • performances of leisure (sports, dance, parades, colonial encounters mediated by theatrical/musical/danced “exchanges”)
  • historical reenactment
  • performances of health
  • histories of sports/leisure and their relationship to cultures of health and/or to unhealth
  • histories of gaming
  • sports, spectatorship, and cultural practices of addiction (gambling, doping)
  • sports and spectatorship (players and audiences, the sport star)
  • global and local cultures of sport

The ISCH also welcomes panel and paper proposals on methods and theories of cultural history.

New York City is at the intersection of performance, politics, and play. The United Nations headquarters and Trump Tower call attention to the city’s inextricable links to global politics. The theaters of Broadway are renowned for their nightly shows. But performance also takes place in ballrooms and recording studios, in art galleries, as well as on city streets by activists, aspiring artists, and buskers. From Central Park to Coney Island, the city has long been associated with leisure. Reflecting the diversity of the city itself, conference events and prearranged cultural excursions will take place at a variety of different institutions.

Presentations should be no more than 20 minutes in length and delivered in English. Individual paper proposals should consist of an abstract (not exceeding 300 words) and a 1-2 page CV. Panel proposals should consist of the name of the organizer, an overview of the panel (not exceeding 500 words), abstracts for each paper (not to exceed 300 words), and 1-2 page CVs for each presenter. The deadline to submit proposals is January 15, 2018. Participants will be informed by February 5, 2018. Proposals and inquiries should be sent to ISCH2018@gmail.com.

Those whose abstracts are accepted for presentation will be expected to become members of the ISCH. Further details can be found on the society’s website: http://www.culthist.net/membership/.

Presenters are invited to consider submitting articles to the ISCH’s official peer-reviewed journal, Cultural History (published by the Edinburgh University Press), and monographs to the book series it publishes with Routledge. Links to each respective publication opportunity follow:

http://www.euppublishing.com/loi/cult

https://www.routledge.com/Studies-for-the-International-Society-for-Cultural-History/book-series/SISCH

The main conference events will be held at Faculty House, 64 Morningside Dr., Columbia University. Further information, including hotels with discounted group rates, will be available soon on the ISCH website. This event is not affiliated with, endorsed by, or sponsored by Columbia University.

North American Conference on British Studies Annual Meeting

CFP: North American Conference on British Studies (3/30/2018; 10/25-28/2018)

North American Conference on British Studies Annual Meeting
Providence, Rhode Island
October 25-28, 2018

The NACBS and its affiliate, the Northeast Conference on British Studies, seek participation by scholars in all areas of British Studies for the 2018 meeting. They will meet in Providence, Rhode Island, from October 25-28, 2018. They solicit proposals for presentations on Britain, the British Empire, and the British world, including topics relating to component parts of Britain and on British influence (or vice versa) in Ireland, the Commonwealth, and former colonies in Asia, Africa, and the Caribbean (etc.) Their interests range from the medieval to the modern. The NACBS welcomes participation by scholars from across the humanities and social sciences, from all parts of the globe (not just North America), and from all career stages and backgrounds. They reaffirm our commitment to British Studies broadly conceived, and welcome proposals that reflect the diversity of scholars and scholarship in the field.

The NACBS invites panel proposals that address selected themes, methodology, and pedagogy, as well as roundtable discussions of topical and thematic interest, including conversations among authors of recent books, reflections on landmark scholarship, and discussions about professional practice. They are particularly interested in submissions that have a broad chronological focus and/or interdisciplinary breadth. Standard panels typically include three presenters speaking for 20 minutes each, a commentator, and a chair, while roundtables typically include four presenters speaking for 15 minutes each and a chair. They are open to other formats, though; please feel free to consult with the program committee chair.

The NACBS hopes to secure as broad a range of participation as possible and will thus consider individual paper proposals in addition to the standard full panel proposals. Their preference is for panels that include both emerging and established scholars; they welcome the participation of junior scholars and Ph.D. candidates beyond the qualifying stage. To foster intellectual interchange, they ask applicants to compose panels that feature participation from multiple institutions. In an effort to allow a broader range of participants, no participant will be permitted to take part in more than one session in a substantial role. (That is, someone presenting or commenting on one panel cannot also present or comment on another, though individuals presenting or commenting on one panel may serve as chairs for other panels, if need be.) Submissions are welcome from participants in last year’s conference, though if the number of strong submissions exceeds the number of available spaces, selection decisions may take into account recent participation.

As complete panels are more likely to be accepted, the NACBS recommends that interested participants issue calls on H-Albion or social media (e.g., @TheNACBS on Twitter or on the NACBS Facebook page) to arrange a panel. If a full panel cannot be arranged by the deadline, however, please do submit the individual proposal and the program committee will try to build submissions into full panels as appropriate.

In addition to the panels, they will be sponsoring a poster session. The posters will be exhibited throughout the conference, and there will be a scheduled time when presenters will be with their posters to allow for further discussion. The submission website (http://www.nacbs.org/conference) will open in early January; submissions will close as of 30 March 2018.

All submissions are electronic, and need to be completed in one sitting. Before you start your submission, you should have the following information:

  • Names, affiliations and email addresses for all panel participants. Please note: The NACBS creates the program from the submission, so be sure that names, institutional titles, and paper titles are provided as they should appear on the program.
  • A note whether data projection is necessary, desired, or unnecessary.
  • A brief summary CV for each participant, indicating education, current affiliations, and major publications. (750 words maximum per CV.)
  • Title and abstract for each paper or presentation. Roundtables do not need titles for each presentation, but if you have them, that is fine. If there is no title, there should still be an abstract – i.e. “X will speak about this subject through the lens of this period/approach/region etc.”
  • Posters: Those proposing posters should enter organizer information and first presenter information only.

All communication will be through the panel organizer, who will be responsible for ensuring that members of the panel receive the information they need. All program presenters must be current members of the NACBS by September 28, one month before the conference, or risk being removed from the program.

Some financial assistance will become available for graduate students (up to $500) and for a limited number of under/unemployed members within ten years of their terminal degree ($300). Details of these travel grants and how to apply will be posted to www.nacbs.org and emailed to members after the program for the 2018 meeting is prepared.

2018 Comparative Drama conference

To be held in Orlando Florida on April 5-7th, the 2018 Comparative Drama Conference is seeking papers and panel proposals, due December 3rd.

Abstract Submission Deadline: 3 December 2017

Papers reporting on original investigations and critical analysis of research and developments in the field of drama and theatre are invited for the 42nd Comparative Drama Conference, hosted by Rollins College in Orlando, Florida, to be held April 5-7, 2018 . Papers may be comparative across nationalities, periods and disciplines; and may deal with any issue in dramatic literature, criticism, theory, and performance, or any method of historiography, translation, or production. Papers should be 15 minutes in length, written for oral presentation, and accessible to a multi-disciplinary audience. Scholars and artists in all languages and literatures are invited to email a 250 word abstract in English to Dr. William C. Boles at compdrama@rollins.edu by 3 December 2017. Please include paper title, author’s name, status (faculty, graduate student, other/scholar-at-large), institutional affiliation, and postal address at top left. Abstracts must present a clear argument and have an appropriate scope (usually two or fewer works). (PLEASE be sure to add compdrama@rollins.edu to your accepted email list so that conference emails will not be rejected by your server. Ask your IT administrator how to do so.) If you do not receive e-mail confirmation that we received your abstract/submission within 14 days, we did not receive your submission. Please contact us immediately at wboles@rollins.edu. Those whose abstracts are accepted for presentation are expected to attend the conference. Due to the number of submissions, the adjudicators are unable to offer specific feedback on panels, abstracts, or scripts. Abstracts will be printed in the conference program. Accepted presentations will be scheduled in a room with a projector, screen, and speakers. If you wish to use a laptop, please bring your own as well as a dongle. We do not provide remote control devices.

Pre-organized Panels

Pre-organized Panels and Roundtables will also be considered. A pre-organized panel should include three papers. Each paper should be 15 minutes in length. Panel proposals should include (1) a copy of each panelist’s 250 word abstract with paper title, author’s name, institutional affiliation, status, postal address and email address at top left, and (2) a succinct, 50-word rationale for the grouping of the papers. The panel organizer should email the abstracts and rationale to compdrama@rollins.edu by 3 December 2017. A pre-organized roundtable should include at least four participants. Roundtable proposals should include (1) a succinct, 50 word explanation of and rationale for the roundtable topic, (2) a timeline of the program, including time for audience interaction and Q & A, and (3) clear evidence of each participant’s expertise in the topic area. Do not send entire vitae. Include only evidence applicable to the roundtable topic. The panel or roundtable organizer should email the abstracts and rationale to compdrama@rollins.edu by 3 December 2017.